Not So Smooth Sailing at Salt Creek

24 07 2017

And you thought you got too close to The Point at Salt Creek (one of our near neighbor surf spots).

salt creek sailboat aground

Source: Surfline.com Salt Creek live webcam

Checking the surf using Surfline webcams this morning, we happened across a marine safety response.  What looks to be a couple Dana Point Marina Harbor Patrol boats are assisting a grounded sailboat on The Point at low tide.  A couple hours prior, the tide bottomed out at about -1.38′.

From what I hear from various ocean lifeguards along the Orange County coast, grounding of boats isn’t all that uncommon.  And, it is seldom very clear as to exactly what happened, many times occurring at night.  One can only imagine what would have distracted a pilot from his/her navigational duties long enough to run into the rocks on a relatively clear night, with houses lit up on the beach and 60-foot coastal  bluffs behind them.

Or, maybe they lost their anchor or had a medical emergency that kept them from their duties.  Or, maybe the boat was full of illegal drugs making their way north.  Just very unfortunate all around.  Fortunately, there was little to no surf on this warm, tropical morning.  During the time we were watching, there was no sign of the pilot or anyone else from onboard.  Hopefully, everyone got out safely.

It’s a good thing we haven’t seen this happen at Uppers lately.  It can be a little dangerous for our already sometimes dangerous Crowd.

Smooth sailing!?

 

 

 

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Red-Legged Frogs at San Onofre State Beach?

26 06 2014

What’s hoppin’ at Uppers?

Not this poor little guy.

iPhone5-sized frog (with flash)

iPhone5-sized frog (with flash)

iPhone5-sized frog (without flash)

iPhone5-sized frog (without flash)

On Wednesday, June 25th, I found him in the sand at water’s edge at the mouth of San Mateo Creek, the lagoon that flows into our favorite surf spot, Upper Trestles, at San Onofre State Beach. He had already expired very recently, maybe from the salt water, but the nearby sea gulls had not spotted him yet.

Have you ever heard of the Caliornia Red-Legged Frog (Rana draytonii), a “threatened” species under the Federal Endangered Species Act?   There are protected “critical habitats” throughout many areas of California for this species, from the coast to the mountains, though I didn’t see any areas mapped for Orange County.

Now I am not a herpetologist, but this does appear to be a frog.  And, it does appear to have reddish legs.  So, I passed it along to the San Clemente State Park staff to determine what to do with it.

If it is a red-legged frog, it would not be the first species on the Federal ESA list to be found in the San Mateo Creek watershed.  It is one of the last mostly-untouched wilderness areas along the Southern California coast.  Thank God for the Marines and their Camp Pendleton Base that protects the lower watershed and divinely-created critters like this.

Let’s all do our part to preserve the nature around us that makes Trestles such an idyllic refuge for all of us.





Tsunami Damage in Newport Beach?

11 03 2011

Got your attention!  No damage to report here.

It seems like every year we all learn a little more about tsunami’s and what they can do to low lying beach areas.

Inspiration Point, Corona del Mar, 8:45 am, 3/11/11

So, always in the pursuit of learning, I thought I’d stop by my local tsunami-watching area after the 8.9 earthquake in Japan today — Inspiration Point in Corona del Mar (Newport Beach, California).  I was there when the first surge hit the beach (or so it seemed).  I obviously wasn’t the only one there.   There had to be at least 100 fellow gawkers.  We had the all-girl (30 somethings) running club, the homeless guy with the guitar, all sorts of tourists, dogs, and construction workers.

So, what happened?

If you read my posting on tsunami physics, you know the answer.

Over a few minutes, you could see the water advance up the beach a foot or so (vertically).  The tide was supposed to be at its lowest point, so the rise would not be expected.  The second photo shows the high tide markings from overnight.  The water advanced to about 8 to 10 feet (horizontally) from that high mark.  So, yes we all got to see a tsunami, but none of the rest of the crowd seemed to notice.  I guess they all need to check out TrestlesSurfCrowd.com next time an earthquake happens.

Tide/tsunami levels at Corona del Mar

So, the real show wasn’t the tsunami.  It was the tsunami watchers.  We had the typical silicone-enhanced coffee-sippers, the retired engineers waiting for their next cruise ship, the construction workers stopping by on the way to Home Depot, the spoiled 2-year-olds tugging on their mother’s sweaters while the mothers gab away on their iPhones, and the rest of us faceless people watchers.

I left after the first surge, having seen what I came for.  The rest will probably be waiting out there through lunch waiting for the Hawaii Five-O grinder to take out the houses on the cliff.

Can’t wait til the next earthquake.  Fascinating stuff, huh?